LETTER TELLS OF DEATH OF LIEUT. CLYDE SLAVENS

 

A copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Dorothy M. Slavens, wife of Lieut James Clyde Slavens, was received here this week by Mr. and Mrs. O C.. Slavens, parents of Clyde, telling of his death in Germany. The letter followed a telegram received a few weeks ago stating he had died following wounds received in Germany. The letter follows:

Mrs. Dorothy H. Slavens

Care of B. M. Hgager

Elk City, Oklahoma

 

My Dear Mrs. Slavens:

It is with deep, regret that I inform you of the death of your husband Second Liuet. James C. Slavens 0555802 of Company C, 309th Engineer Combat Battalion who died of wounds received in action against the enemy on February 23rd, 1945. Your husband, who commanded the third platoon of Company C, was in Linnich, Germany, at the time of his death. He was standing in the doorway of a building talking to first Lieut. Alan W. Ker, his company commander, when a mortar hell landed nearby and fragment struck your husband in the head. Although he received prompt medical attention, he died within a short time.

You may be interested in knowing something about the action in which your husband participated with the Division. He was assigned to our Division January 16, 1945, when we were in Belgium, having been sent there from Germany to assist in halting the enemy drive in the Ardennes. The combat engineers played an important part in our Divisions success there during which the enemy again was driven onto German soil. When that mission was completed, our Division returned to Germany to participate in the drive over the Roer River when your husband was killed.

Since joining the Division, Lieut. Slavens had become recognized as an excellent leader whose efficiency was recognized by his men. His death was felt deeply by many friends as a personal loss. Among his many close friends, I am informed were Second Lieut. Earle C. Quimby, Jr., 055762 and Second Lieut. Hirsch C. Meyer, Jr., 055843, both of the 309th Engineer Combat Battalion headquarters, APO 84, care of Postmaster, New York.

A United States Army Chaplain conducted funeral services of Protestant faith at an America Military cemetery in Holland. The cross placed over your husband's grave has been marked permanently with his name and army serial number. Although I am not authorized to reveal the name of the town where the cemetery is located, this information may be obtained from the Graves Registration Branch Quartermaster General, Washington D.C. Whatever personal effects he I had will be returned to you through the Effects Quartermaster, Kansas City Missouri.

With full realizationí of your great sorrow; I extend to you our sincere condolence.

Sincerely,

A.R. Boling,

Major General,

U. S.. Army Commanding.

 

 

 

Clyde was born November 1, at Copan. He moved with his parents to Wolco, in 1931, and attended school there and in Barnsdall, graduating from high school here as honoranian of the class in 1939. During his four years in high school, he was a member of the student council each year, and was secretary-treasurer of the senior class. He entered A. and M., at Stillwater where he lacked only one semester of graduating and receiving his degree in engineering. He was editor of the Oklahoma A. & M. Engineer publication for one year..

Before entering the army in April of 1943 he was employed for about a year in the offices of the City Service Company in Bartlesville. Clyde was commissioned a Second Lieutenant, July 26, 1944, and was married July 29, 1944, to Miss Dorothy Hager of Elk ,City, Okla. He sailed for overseas duty about Dec. 16, 1944.

Besides his parents, and his wife he is survived by two sisters, Mrs Jennie Rudde, now of Montgomery Ala., and Rosaleen at the home here.

 

Cards of Thanks

 

We wish to express our sincere to our friends and neighbors, to the Shell Oil Co. of Wolco, the Christian Church, Royal Neighbor Lodge and others for their kindness and sympathy shown us in our recent bereavement of the loss of our son and brother. We also wish to thank those who contributed flowers, to our sonís memory.

Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Slavens,

Rosaleen Slavens,

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Rudde.